odditiesoflife:

Sokushinbutsu - The Bizarre Practice of Self-Mummification
Scattered throughout Northern Japan around the Yamagata Prefecture are two dozen mummified Japanese monks known as Sokushinbutsu, who caused their own deaths by way of self-mummification. A successful mummification took upwards of ten years. It is believed that many hundreds of monks tried, but only about 20 such mummifications have been discovered to date. 
The elaborate process started with three years of eating a special diet consisting only of nuts and seeds, while taking part in a regimen of rigorous physical activity that stripped them of their body fat. They then ate only bark and roots for another three years and began drinking a poisonous tea made from the sap of the Urushi tree, normally used to lacquer bowls.
This caused vomiting and a rapid loss of bodily fluids, and most importantly, it made the body too poisonous to be eaten by maggots. Finally, a self-mummifying monk would lock himself in a stone tomb barely larger than his body, where he would not move from the lotus position. His only connection to the outside world was an air tube and a bell. Each day he rang a bell to let those outside know that he was still alive.
When the bell stopped ringing, the tube was removed and the tomb sealed. After the tomb was sealed, the other monks in the temple would wait another three years, and open the tomb to see if the mummification was successful. If the monk had been successfully mummified, they were immediately seen as a Buddha and put in the temple for viewing. Usually, though, there was just a decomposed body.
odditiesoflife:

Sokushinbutsu - The Bizarre Practice of Self-Mummification
Scattered throughout Northern Japan around the Yamagata Prefecture are two dozen mummified Japanese monks known as Sokushinbutsu, who caused their own deaths by way of self-mummification. A successful mummification took upwards of ten years. It is believed that many hundreds of monks tried, but only about 20 such mummifications have been discovered to date. 
The elaborate process started with three years of eating a special diet consisting only of nuts and seeds, while taking part in a regimen of rigorous physical activity that stripped them of their body fat. They then ate only bark and roots for another three years and began drinking a poisonous tea made from the sap of the Urushi tree, normally used to lacquer bowls.
This caused vomiting and a rapid loss of bodily fluids, and most importantly, it made the body too poisonous to be eaten by maggots. Finally, a self-mummifying monk would lock himself in a stone tomb barely larger than his body, where he would not move from the lotus position. His only connection to the outside world was an air tube and a bell. Each day he rang a bell to let those outside know that he was still alive.
When the bell stopped ringing, the tube was removed and the tomb sealed. After the tomb was sealed, the other monks in the temple would wait another three years, and open the tomb to see if the mummification was successful. If the monk had been successfully mummified, they were immediately seen as a Buddha and put in the temple for viewing. Usually, though, there was just a decomposed body.

odditiesoflife:

Sokushinbutsu - The Bizarre Practice of Self-Mummification

Scattered throughout Northern Japan around the Yamagata Prefecture are two dozen mummified Japanese monks known as Sokushinbutsu, who caused their own deaths by way of self-mummification. A successful mummification took upwards of ten years. It is believed that many hundreds of monks tried, but only about 20 such mummifications have been discovered to date.

The elaborate process started with three years of eating a special diet consisting only of nuts and seeds, while taking part in a regimen of rigorous physical activity that stripped them of their body fat. They then ate only bark and roots for another three years and began drinking a poisonous tea made from the sap of the Urushi tree, normally used to lacquer bowls.

This caused vomiting and a rapid loss of bodily fluids, and most importantly, it made the body too poisonous to be eaten by maggots. Finally, a self-mummifying monk would lock himself in a stone tomb barely larger than his body, where he would not move from the lotus position. His only connection to the outside world was an air tube and a bell. Each day he rang a bell to let those outside know that he was still alive.

When the bell stopped ringing, the tube was removed and the tomb sealed. After the tomb was sealed, the other monks in the temple would wait another three years, and open the tomb to see if the mummification was successful. If the monk had been successfully mummified, they were immediately seen as a Buddha and put in the temple for viewing. Usually, though, there was just a decomposed body.

After an 8am game theory final Saturday Morning

WOAH NEAT

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert
In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day.  
In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.
Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”
odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert
In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day.  
In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.
Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”
odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert
In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day.  
In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.
Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”
odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert
In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day.  
In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.
Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”
odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert
In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day.  
In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.
Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”
odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert
In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day.  
In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.
Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”
odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert
In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day.  
In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.
Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Transparent Cabin in the Desert

In the splendid beauty and serenity of the desert in Joshua Tree, California, artist Phillip K Smith III revealed his light based project, Lucid Stead. Composed of mirrors, LED lighting and custom-built electronic equipment, the cabin transforms depending on the time of day. 

In daylight, the 70-year-old cabin reflects and refracts the surrounding terrain like a mirage or a hallucination. As the sun sets behind the mountains, slowly shifting geometric color fields emerge and produce incredibly beautiful colors that pierce the night sky.

Smith states, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”

ameliaponders:

middleearth221btardisst:

God I love her.

Best line in television ever

(Source: chantdownbabylon)

cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 
cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 

cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 

(Source: glennoconnell)